CPCD-021 Rick Countryman:The First Bird

 

"the first bird", on Chap Chap Records, Japan (CPCD-021) is a solo work on alto sax from Rick Countryman, recorded in 2021 in the Philippines.

The art of JÖrg Wand is credited for inspiration and direction, as the music evolved from concepts and work with his fractal videos.

There is a clear relationship between his art and this music, as well as his contributions to the cover art and titling the CD and the tracks.

 

You could call it Fractal Jazz...

 

album credits: Recorded 2021, May 16, 17, 23 & June 6 in the Philippines

 

 

Bandcampでの配信はこちら

 

販売価格 ¥2,500(税込)

 

Jazz A Parisのレヴューはこちら

Jazz Tokyoのレヴューはこちら

 

 

発売中!

Featuring Rick Countryman on solo alto sax. Over the past few years, American saxist currently living in the Philippines, Rick Countryman, has been involved with nearly a dozen CD’s of free music from duos, trios & quartets most of which include legendary Japanese drummer Sabu Toyozumi. We’ve reviewed each of these discs and I’ve become quite fond of Mr. Countryman’s consistently spirited playing. As far as I know, this is Rick Countryman’s first solo sax disc. This disc is compiled from four sessions in the Philippines from May & June of this year (2021). This disc sounds like a studio effort, the sound is dry and warm. Countryman has a strong, thoughtful tone, closer to a tenor than an alto without much squeaking or squawking. Countryman takes his time, playing long liner but rarely bending notes too far. There is something striking going on here, a certain lyric quality at the center of the storm. Countryman often takes a lick and then plays around with it, playing a series of lines in which a central lick will be stretched out, carefully bending certain notes, repeating certain lines and then twisting the notes that lead up to the lick or lines of notes that he started with. There is a solemn quality at the center hear with just occasional notes which are bent or carefully stretched. Instead the usual free/jazz frenetics that most sax extremists deal in, we get a more relaxed, mature program that goes down much easier than a constant stream of bent-note calisthenics. The front and back cover here are also somewhat psychedelic and also without being too far out.

 

 Bruce Lee Gallanter, DMG